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Pitchfork Music Festival Paris: Best Sets

Pitchfork Music Festival Paris 2017

Since the renowned music publication's very own festival first made its way across the Atlantic in 2013 – after eight strong years of Chicago-based shenanigans – all manner of alternative heroes have descended on the French capital for the annual autumnal celebration of left-field and exciting musical talent.

What's more, Pitchfork have been pretty hot on sharing these special moments with their fans via the magical medium of the internet. As such, there's a more than ample supply of videos from the festivals to peruse at your pleasure.

We've picked out some of the most memorable, impressive, and exciting sets from the last few years of the festival, to set the wheels of excitement in motion for the next episode in early November. No doubt this year, The National, Run The Jewels or any of the other as-yet-unannounced acts will add their names to this list


Book tickets & packages for Pitchfork Music Festival Paris 2017 here


2013 – Mac DeMarco


It seems that a few years ago, people decided that 'goofball' was the way to describe the inimitable Mac DeMarco, and it looks to have stuck. The self-described 'jizz jazz' aficionado has now garnered hoards of adoring fans, and 2013 is arguably the year when it all began to snowball.


2013 – Darkside

Darkside's reign as arguably the most exciting and interesting act in experimental electronic music was fleeting. In the space of year they released a reimagining of Daft Punk's Random Access Memories as well as their debut album Psychic, before going their own separate ways. Less than a month on from Psychic's release, they enthralled crowds in the Grande Hall de la Villette.

 


2014 – James Blake

With the release of his 2013 album Overgrown, James Blake firmly secured his ascent from experimental 'post-dubstep' producer to inimitable and revered musician. Striking the perfect balance between older material and tracks from his newest album, the set is awash with his soulful and delicate vocals.



2014 – Mogwai

There are few bands that do 'quiet-loud' as well a veteran Scottish post-rockers Mogwai. Although that may seem like a reductive analysis of their sound and set-up, the balance they strike between delicate intricacy and blisteringly loud crescendos makes their live shows unlike any other.


2015 – Beach House

Despite their irrefutable Baltimore roots, Beach House are a band with strong links to Paris. Lead singer Victoria Legrand was born in the city before moving to the USA, and later returned for theatre school studies. The duo's suitably dreamy performance in the French capital came just after releasing two albums in the space of three months.
 


2015 – Rhye


When they first attracted attention in 2012 and 2013, Rhye were shrouded in mystery, compounded by the androgynous vocal performances that drew comparisons to Sade. The duo are in fact Michael Milosh and Robin Hannibal, but their live set-up extends beyond the two of them to a full band complete with strings, piano and drums, giving their performances the air of being in a smokey jazz club.


2016 – Floating Points


After a relatively low-key few years in the electronic underground, multi-faceted musician and producer Sam Shepard - better known as Floating Points – was catapulted into the attention of music fans across the globe in late 2015 following the release of his critically acclaimed debut album Elaenia. Fusing ambient and experimental electronic music with elements of jazz, the record made for a captivating live show.


2016 – Whitney

From the ashes of the beloved but disbanded Chicago indie band Smith Westerns came Whitney, in 2015. The following year – which culminated in their Pitchfork Music Festival Paris show – was huge for the band as their debut album Light Upon The Lake met with critical acclaim, making its way into numerous year-end lists.
 


Pitchfork Music Festival Paris 2017 takes place 1-3 November. Book tickets & packages here, and see our guide for more information. 


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