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Parklife 2017: Ten Tracks We Can't Wait to Hear

19 April 2017 16:20

As Parklife rolls into Manchester for another eclectic weekend in just over a month's time, we've made our own snap decision to allow ourselves the chance to begin getting legitimately excited.

And just like every General Election, we're sure what we're about to unleash will be just as highly contested. But then again, we love opening a can of worms. 

So without further ado, here are our (my) top ten songs we can't wait to hear at Parklife 2017.


Book tickets and packages to Parklife Festival 2017


Frank Ocean – Pink + White

Singer, songwriter, rapper and generally all-round smooth operator Frank Ocean will be making his first UK appearance since 2014. Having risen to fame as a member of American rap collective Odd Future, and the success of his debut album Channel Orange in 2012, his Parklife appearance will the first time to hear him perform tracks from his second critically acclaimed album Blonde. 

And that includes this cheeky number with none other than Beyoncé.


The 1975 – Chocolate

One of my fondest musical memories was catching these inside Liverpool's Zanzibar for Sound City while I was at University in the city. They shared a bill with the likes of Swim Deep, but it was clear from that sweaty moment who the real stars of the night were as the whole venue bopped along to the infectiously catchy Chocolate.


Boy Better Know – Too Many Man

As grime continues its pursuit into the mainstream, for many their first interaction with the genre was Boy Better Know's Too Many Men. Released in 2009, still four years after the group was formed, the track permeated clubs throughout the capital and cleared the road ahead for the underground culture.


A Tribe Called Quest – Can I Kick It

With more samples than a carpet shop, the third single from A Tribe Called Quest's debut album apparently made the band no money. Why? Lou Reed scooped it all up thanks to it sampling Walk on the Wild Side. Whatever the politics, it's gone on to become one of the defining songs of the past 30 years.


Two Door Cinema Club – What You Know

Another shameful "I was there moment" was with Two Door Cinema Club. Having first seen them in London's Heaven nightclub supporting Foals, and still minus a full-time drummer at this point, it was clear these boys would be moving onto bigger stages.

Characterised by noodling guitar riffs, catchy choruses and legless dancing, it was one of those rare occasions where the support band were definitely worth getting down there early for.


Chaka Khan – I'm Every Woman

They'll be few who won't have danced around their kitchen to this disco classic. Surely one of the most euphoric, infectious and timeless songs, you'll be hard pushed to find a better three minutes than this across the weekend.


Damian Marley – Welcome to Jamrock

Damian's dark portrayal of the Jamaica hidden from the commercial spotlight – a place ridden with crime, poverty and political corruption – carried on the legacy of his father, and cemented himself as an inspiration to Jamaicans everywhere.


Stormzy – Know Me From

While Boy Better Know includes some of grime's most original names, its newest stalwart Stormzy is no imitator. His debut album, Gang Signs & Prayer, was the first grime album to reach number one on the UK's Albums Chart. Mixing classic grime with elements of gospel and R&B, the South London born artist has firmly drawn the spotlight to the genre, becoming 2017's man of the moment. 

But as with every live performance, things really start to kick off when he takes things back to the very start. Expect the mosh-pit crew to be out in force when this one drops.


Loyle Carner – Damselfy

Honest and laid bare, Loyle Carner's debut album was described by the Guardian as "confessional hip-hop". Made up of mournful piano and jazzy guitar chords alongside skits featuring his mother, Yesterday is characterised by classic British melancholy: grey streets and rainy days. All the more striking when set against the resurgent urban clatter of grime. 


Sampha – No One Knows Me Like The Piano (In My Mother's Home)

Quite possibly one of 2017's most beautifully delicate songs, Sampha's piano ballad is an outpouring of emotion by a man who's always had tragedy at his shoulder. Bought by his father when he was just three years old, as an alternative to the TV, the musical instrument became a beacon of stability in a life filled with death and heartache.


Parklife Festival will take place on 10-11 June 2017. Find out more on our guide, and book your tickets and packages here, including GA and VIP tickets, which are sold out everywhere else.

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